+264 811295024 info@harambeetravel.com

Overland Safari

Best of both worlds Vic falls

Our tour proposal is subject to availability.

Highlights: Discover the best of 3 worlds – Namibia, Botswana and Zimbabwe! Visit the Animal Kingdom in Etosha National Park, the Caprivi Park and the Chobe National Park in Botswana. Here you will experience encounters with the wild like never before and the majestic Victoria Falls will take your breath away.
Duration: 23 days / 22 nights
Departure: On request
Pick-ups: Windhoek
Drop-off: Vic Falls
Minimum Participants: 10 Pax
Maximum Participants: 20 Pax
Mode of transport: Overlander Truck
Prices: Available on request
Options: Mixture of Lodges & Camping
Day 1 – Windhoek

Arrival at the International Airport, where you will be greeted by your english speaking driverguide. Transfer to Windhoek and check-in.

Upon arrival in the cosmopolitan city we will undertake city and township that will give us some exciting cultural experience.

We will enjoy our delicious dinner at rustic Joe’s Beerhouse, which is renowned for its finest cuisine.

Bed and breakfast, Windhoek Mountain Lodge or similar

 

Day 2 – Windhoek – Kalahari Desert

Breakfast and depart into the southern part of our country via Rehoboth to Kalahari Anib Lodge.

The Kalahari Desert forms a great part of the eastern side of Namibia. Because of its sandy ground it doesn’t allow enough water absorption into the soil. Due to the extremely high evaporation in this area, it is characterised as a Desert. In reality it is a lively wilderness and on the sparce grass plains you can see huge herds of antelopes and other animals grazing.

Today we will enjoy the nature drive on the amazing red dunes of kalahari desert and end the day with a sundowner.

Full board basis, Kalahari Anib Lodge or similar.

 

Day 3&4 – Kalahari – Fish river canyon

After an early breakfast, depart via Mariental and Keetmanshoop to your next destination.

Enroute you have the opportunity to visit the local Quiver Tree Forest and Giants Playground near Keetmanshoop.

About 14km north-west of Keetmanshoop on the farm Gariganus is the Quiver Tree Forest, a dense stand of quiver trees, some of which reach a height of 7m. The quiver tree’s name is derived from the Bushman practice of hollowing out the pithy insides of the branches and using the tough, outer casings of bark as quivers in which to keep their arrows.

During our two day stay we will explore the stunning fish river canyon.

The fish river canyon is the second largest canyon in the world. Set in a harsh, stony plain scantily covered with drought resistant succulents and the distinctive quiver tree or kokerboom, the canyon represents a spectacular natural phenomenon which took hundreds of millions of years to evolve into its current shape. While the full length of the canyon is 161 km, the most spectacular section is the 56 km long stretch which lies between the northernmost and southernmost viewpoints. Baboons, rock dassie’s, ground squirrel’s and klipspringer are commonly sighted in the canyon.

Fullboard basis, Canon Mountain Camp or similar

 

Day 5 Fish River – Sesriem Area

After breakfast departure via Seeheim, Aus, Helmeringhausen and Maltahöhe to our lodge.

We will continue via Aus and Duwisib Castle via Helmeringhausen en Maltahöhe to our lodge situated near Sesriem.

An intriguing feature of the southern Namib are the legendary desert horses which can be seen when travelling between Lüderitz and Aus. There are a number of theories regarding their origin, one of these and the most likely theory, is that they are descendants of horses left behind when the German “Schutztruppe’ abandoned Aus during the South West African Campaign in 1915. Here you will also find the remains of houses built during their imprisonment during World War I. About 1500 German Soldiers from the “Schutztruppe’ were kept here as prisoners.

The remainder of the afternoon can be spend at own leisure or you can relax at the swimming pool.

Fullboard basis, Betesda Lodge Campsite or similar

 

Day 6 –  Sossusvlei and Sesriem Canyon

After an early breakfast you will drive into the Namib Naukluft Park to visit one of the highest dunes in the world. The last 5 km will be driven with a 4×4 Shuttle.

This is a dune wonderland, with towering dunes up to 300m high surrounding a huge, dried-up pan. Dunes extend as far as the eye can see and their rich tints vary from pale apricot to vivid reds and oranges. During a good rainy season the Tsauchab River flows into the pan which creates a heaven for water birds. Even during the dry season, oryx, springbok and ostriches can be seen feeding off the sparse vegetation along the water course.

At the entrance to Sossusvlei is Sesriem Canyon, where centuries of erosion have incised a narrow gorge about 1 km in length. At the foot of the gorge, which plunges down for 30m to 40m, are deep pools of water which become replenished after good rains. Sesriem derives its name from the time when early pioneers tied six lenghts of rawhide thongs together to draw water from these pools.

Late afternoon return to the lodge and enjoy the rest of the afternoon at own leisure.

Fullboard basis, Betesda Lodge campsite or similar

 

Day 7 –  Sesriem – Swakopmund

Today you will drive through the Desert via Walvis Bay to Swakopmund.

One of the oldest deserts in the world, maybe the very oldest, the Namib was already arid at least 80 million years ago. In the south it extends into South Africa, across the Orange River, while in the north it crosses the Kunene into Angola. The greater part of the Namib lies inside Namibia, where it occupies some 1500km of Atlantic coastline. In width it generally varies between 80 and 140 km, but in places reaches inland for as much as 200 km.

Swakopmund is much loved by Namibians as a welcome respite from the inland heat. It is also popular amongst visitors because of its old-world charm and relaxed atmosphere. Founded in 1892 during the period of German colonial rule, it served as the territory’s main harbour for many years. The distinct German colonial character has been well preserved and today many of the old buildings serve a useful purpose.The Woermann House (1905) now houses an art gallery. The Woermann Tower was used in earlier times to see if ships came into the harbour. Other old interesting buildings are: “Die Alte Kaserne”, “Hohenzollern Haus”and the Railway Station Building

Fullboard basis, Dorm accommodation in Amanpuri Lodge or similar

 

Day 8 –  Swakopmund

You have the whole of today at own leisure to explore this coastal town on your own.

Alternatively you can take part in many optional acitivities on offer. Activities like: boat cruises, Catamaran cruises, dolphine cruise, quadbiking, sky-diving, Living Desert Tour, Township tours, Scenic flights etc. Etc. More information upon arrival in Namibia.

Fullboard basis, Dorm accommodation in Amanpuri Lodge or similar

 

Day 9 – Swakopmund – Brandberg

After a hearty breakfast departure via Henties Bay and Uis to Brandberg White Lady Lodge.

En route we will visit Cape Cross which is a home of seals.

The largest and best known of the 23 breeding colonies of Cape fur seals along the coast of South Africa and Namibia is the Cape Cross Seal Reserve north of Swakopmund. During the November/December breeding season as many as 200 000 seals gather at Cape Cross. It was here that the Portuguese navigator, Diego Cao, erected a stone cross in 1486. Also at Cape Cross is a small lichen reserve where a relatively large variety of these interesting and slow-growing organisms are protected.

Afterwards depart to Uis and arrival at our campsite. With the help of our assistant guide we will put on our tents.

Followed by a delicious dinner around the fire.

Fullboard basis, Brandberg White Lady lodge campsite or similar

 

Day 10 – Brandberg

Today we will visit the impressive Brandberg mountain which is the highest in Namibia.

The imposing Brandberg massif is a challenge to rock climbers, especially its peak “Königstein”, which at 2573m is the highest peak in Namibia. While its name is Afrikaans for “burnt mountain” the Brandberg is most famous for the rock painting known as the “White Lady”, which is painted on an overhang in Maack’s Shelter – named after the surveyor who discovered it in 1917. Maack’s Shelter lies in the Tsisab gorge, a wild and beautiful ravine amongst a vast jumble of rocks, remnants of many ancient landslides.

Return to the campsite and you may take part on the activities on offer.

Fullboard basis, Brandberg White Lady campsite or similar

 

Day 11 & 12 – Brandberg – Damaraland

After breakfast our journey continues today to enchanting Damaralnd.

During our two day stay we will have an opportunity to visit Organ pipes and burnt mountains, twyfelfontein and Damara living museum.

South of Twyfelfontein is the Burnt Mountain, a panorama of desolation with coloured rocks contrasting vividly against the grey-black surroundings. The Organ Pipes, a mass of basalt slabs in a ravine gouged out by a river, is another geological curiosity in the area.

Twyfelfontein, meaning doubtful fountain, which lies to the west of Khorixas, resembles a large, open-air art gallery. This treasure house of rock engravings left by stone-age artists is regarded as one of the richest collections in Africa.

Fullboard basis, Aba Huab Campsite or similar

 

Day 13 – Damaraland – Etosha

Departure via Khorixas, Kamanjab and Outjo to direction of Etosha Nationalpark.

En route we will visit petrified forest and continue our journey to Kamanjab where we will have an opportunity to visit himba village.

The Himba are semi-nomadic people and are one of the most photographed ethnic groups of Namibia due to their unique appearance, The Himba women have a particularly distinctive appearance and can take several hours for beauty care every morning rubbing their body with a cream consisting of butterfat and ochre powder which gives the body a reddish tinge. There are about 20, 000 to 50,000 Himba people living in northern Namibia, in the Kunene region. They speak the same language as the Herero and predominantly breed cattle and goats. Clothes, hairstyle and jewellery are all of particular significance to the Himba.

We will arrive in Etosha National park and undertake our first game drive with our own truck in the park.

Fullboard basis, Okaukuejo Campsite or similar

 

Day 14  – Full day game drive in Etosha National park

Today is dedicated for full day game drive into Etosha National park with our truck until we will reach our campsite situated near von Lindequist gate.

The Etosha National Park, consisting of 22 270 sq km of saline desert, savannah and woodlands, is one of the largest parks in Africa. Its definitive feature is the Etosha Pan, a vast, shallow depression of approximately 5000 sq km. For the greater part of the year, the pan is a bleak expanse of white cracked mud which shimmers with mirages on most days. It is seeing vast herds of game with this eerie “great white place of dry water” as a backdrop which makes the Etosha experience unique. A total of about 114 mammal species are found in the park, including several rare and endangered, such as black rhino and black-faced impala. About 300 bird species occur in the park, of which approximately one third are migratory, including the European bee-eater and several species of waders.

Fullboard basis, Namutoni Camp or similar

 

Day 15  –  Etosha – Roy’s Camp

Early breakfast and we will depart for the bushmen village near Tsintsabis, where we can learn more about the culture of the San people.

Afterwards we will continue via Tsumeb and Grootfontein to Roy’s Camp.

The town of Tsumeb, gateway to the north, has been closely linked to the mining industry since 1905. The history of Tsumeb is depicted in the Tsumeb museum, where a comprehensive collection of rare minerals can be viewed. In the Khorab room a collection of restored cannons and other armaments, which were dumped into Lake Otjikoto by the German forces, are displayed.

The largest known meteorite in the world, the Hoba Meteorite, lies in a shallow depression on the farm Hoba-West about 20km west of Grootfontein. The 50t mass of nickel and iron, which is between 100 million and 300 million years old, crashed on earth some 30 000 to 80 000 years ago. Discovered by Jacobus Hermanus Brits in the 1920s, it was periodically subjected to vandalism.

Tonight we will enjoy delicious dinner around the fire at our campsite.

Fullboard basis, Roy’s Campsite or similar

 

 Day 16 & 17 – Roy’s Camp – Rundu

Leisure breakfast before we start our journey to direction of Rundu to our destination.

Rundu, the capital of the Kavango Region, is 248 km northeast of Grootfontein. Situated on a high bank, the town overlooks the Kavango River and the derelict settlement of Calai in Angola. It is also the home of Namibia’s well-known Kavango woodcarvers.

We will undertake sunset cruise on the banks of Okavango river on the day of arrival.

Fullboard basis, N’kwazi Campsite or similar

 

Day 18  – Rundu – Kongola

Departure via Bagani and Divundu to our lodge near Kongola.

En route will have a chance to visit Popa Falls with its breathtaking views.

The name Popa Falls conjures up images of a raging waterfall, so little wonder that first-time visitors are disappointed when the “falls” turn out to be nothing more than a series of rapids. A quartzite ledge that obstructs the flow of the river across its 1,2 km width creates the rapids. Here, the river splits into numerous channels, separated by small islands, to form a series of cascades with a total drop of about 4 m.

We will continue via Caprivi Strip to our lodge.

Fullboard basis, Namushasha Campsite or similar

 

Day 19  – Bwafata National Park

Today is dedicated for the game drive and boatcruise in Bwafata Nationalpark with our own truck.

Bwabwata National park – formerly the Caprivi Game Park – includes 5 main zones, the West Caprivi Triangle around Kongola, the Mahango Game Reserve, Popa Falls, the Buffalo Core Area near Divundu and the West Caprivi Game Reserve. Known as the “people park” as it supports both large wildlife and human populations. The Bwabwata National park is a sanctuary to 35 large and numerous small game species and as many as 339 bird species. Bwabwata aims to rehabilitate wildlife populations that were virtually destroyed by poaching. The landscape is generally flat with patchy vegetation-covered dunes. Dominating trees of the area include wild seringa, copalwood, Zambezi teak, wild teak, wild raisin species, and bushwillow.

Fullboard basis, Namushasha Campsite or similar

 

Day 20 –   Chobe National Park

After we enjoyed our delicious breakfast we dedicate this morning for a game drive in open vehicle into Chobe National park.

Well over 400 of Namibia’s bird species occur in this part of the country and the region is steadily gaining a reputation as a retreat for bird – watchers, nature lovers and specialist travellers. It is also a growing interest to scientists studying the wetlands system and its flora and fauna. Sunset river cruises, photo safaris, swamp safaris, boating, a trip in a mokoro or dug out canoe and game viewing either in 4×4 vehicles or by boat are available for holidaymakers in this region.

The remainder of the afternoon can be spend at own leisure.

Fullboard basis, Senyati Safari Campsite

 

Day 21 – Chobe – Vic Falls

Todays journey will takes us leisurely via Kazangula and Seseke to Vic Falls.

We will visit this stunning Victoria falls that will give you really a breathtaking moments.

Victoria Falls, one of the Seven Wonders of the World, is the largest sheet of falling water. In full flood some 500 million litres of water cascade downwards at a speed of 100 meters per minute, causing a thunderous roar and towering columns of spray, hence the local name “mosi – u – tunya” meaning the smoke that thunders.Vic Falls is one of the top tourist destinations in the world. It has the wildest one day white water rafting trips on the planet and until recently the highest commercial bungee jump on earth.

Dinner, bed and breakfast, The Kingdoms Hotel

 

 Day 22  – Departure

Until your airport transfer the remainder of the day can be spend at own leisure.

 
Day Accommodation Meals
Day 1 Windhoek Mountain Lodge D,B
Day 2 Kalahari Anib Lodge L,D,B
Day 3 Canon Mountain Camp L,D,B
Day 4 Canon Mountain Camp L,D,B
Day 5 Betesda Lodge L,D,B
Day 6 Betesda Lodge L,D,B
Day 7 Amanpuri Lodge L,D,B
Day 8 Amanpuri Lodge L,D,B
Day 9 Brandberg White Lady L,D,B
Day 10 Brandberg White Lady L,D,B
Day 11 Aba Huab L,D,B
Day 12 Aba Huab L,D,B
Day 13 Okaukuejo L,D,B
Day 14 Namutoni L,D,B
Day 15 Roy’s Camp L,D,B
Day 16 N’kwazi Lodge L,D,B
Day 17 N’kwazi Lodge L,D,B
Day 18 Namushasha Lodge L,D,B
Day 19 Namushasha Lodge L,D,B
Day 20 Senyati Safari Camp L,D,B
Day 21 Senyati Safari Camp L,D,B
Day 22 The Kingdom Hotel L,D,B
Day 23 Departure B
 
Included in the tour’s price:
Not included in the tour’s price:
Vehicle Fuel – Qualified professional Driverguide = 1 Person
Accommodation
Accommodation & Meals for the Guide
Meals (as per itinerary)
Park entrance fees as per itinerary
Activities as indicated in the itinerary
Water on board
Porterage
Passenger Liability’
15% VAT
2% Tourism Levy
All expenses of personal nature
Entrance fees not mentioned in the itinerary
All meals not mentioned above
Drinks at lodges and on road
All optional excursions and activities
Airport transfers
Tips for tour guides
International flights and airport taxes
Items not mentioned in the itinerary
  1. Sightseeing tour in Windhoek
  2. Sundowner Drive
  3. Quivertree forest and giants playground
  4. Fish River Canyon
  5. Visit to Duwisib Castle
  6. Sossusvlei & Sesriem Canyon
  7. Welwitschia Mirabillis and Moon landscape
  8. Day at own leisure
  9. Cape Cross
  10. Guided tour to Brandberg Mountain
  11. Scenic drive to Damaraland
  12. Twyfelfontein, organ pipes and burnt Mountain
  13. Petried forest and visit to Himba village near Kamanjab
  14. Full day game drive in Etosha National Park
  15. Visit Bushmen village and sightseeing at Hoba Meteorite
  16. Sunset cruise at N’kwazi Lodge
  17. Optional activities
  18. En route visit Popa Falls and drive through Caprivi Strip
  19. Game Drive and Boatcruise in Bwafata National Park
  20. Boatcruise at Chobe River
  21. Game Drive in open vehicle in Chobe Park
  22. Tour of the Vic Falls
  23. Transfer to Vic falls airport for your return flight
Climate

Winter (May to September) Temperatures in the interior range from 18˚C to 25˚C during the day. Below freezing temperatures and ground frosts are common at night.

Summer (October to April) Average interior temperatures range from 20˚C to 34˚C during the day .Temperatures above 40˚C is often recorded in the extreme north and south of the country.

The coast influenced by the cold Benguela current, boasts a relatively stable range of 15˚C to 25˚C. Heavy fog is fairly common at night.

Humidity is generally very low in most parts of Namibia, but it can reach as high as 80% in the extreme north during summer.

The rainy season is from October to April. Average annual rainfall varies from less than 50mm along the coast to 350 mm in the central interior and 700 mm in the Caprivi. The sporadic rains do not affect road travel significantly, however, tourists should exercise caution when crossing or camping in riverbeds during the rainy season, as flash floods are common.

Visitors should pack both warm and cold weather clothing for any visit to Namibia. Windhoek boasts a number of excellent safari outfitters and tourists are advised to shop for clothing upon arrival. Hats, sunglasses, lip balm, moisturizer and sunblock are essential when visiting Namibia.

 

Drinking Water

Tap water is safe and palatable in Namibia, unless specifically stated at particular location. Tourists travelling by road are advised to carry sufficient water at all times. Mineral water and ice are readily available at most service stations and shops.

 

Credit cards

We accept major credit cards such as Credit/Debit Card: American Express, Diners Club, MasterCard and Visa. Check with your credit or debit card company for details of merchant acceptability and other services, which may be available. Please note, service stations do not accept credit for petrol. Plan accordingly.

 

Currency

The Namibia Dollar (N$) and the South African Rand are the only legal tender in Namibia. The two currencies are on par. Foreign currency, travellers and personal cheques can be converted to the Namibian Dollar at any bank or Bureau de Change.

 

Duty Free Import

Visitors may import duty free 400 Cigarettes or 50 Cigars or 250g Pipe Tobacco, 2 litres Wine, 1 litre Spirit or other alcoholic beverages, 50 ml Perfume, 250 ml Toiletry Water.

 

Electrical Appliances

All run on 220/240 volts. Outlets are of the round 3 pin, 15 amp type.

 

Firearms

Handguns are not permitted in Namibia. Only properly licensed hunting rifles with valid permits for Namibia are permitted. Licenses and permits should be applied for well in advance, as attempting to do so at the border is a lengthy process. Hunting rifles are not permitted in Botswana, and have to be carried sealed if in transit to Namibia. All arms and ammunition should be declared even if in possession of a valid South African permit.

 

Health

Medical services in Namibia are of a very high standard. However, the availability of most services is restricted to the main towns. Emergencies and accidents occurring in remote areas do attract a high cost when transport to the main towns is required. Host establishments should be able to organize these services when requested.

The north of Namibia, including Etosha National Park, is a malaria-endemic area. Travellers are advised to have the necessary medication/prophylaxis and also carry insect repellents and sprays. Please consult a local doctor or pharmacist on the correct prophylactics for the specific area of entry. Blood in Namibia is donated by selected, unpaid volunteer. The Blood Transfusion Service of Namibia screens all blood products for transmissible diseases including hepatitis and AIDS. An insurance service for tourists is available from rescue companies providing one to three months coverage for emergency transport.

 

Language

The official language is English. All documents, notices and signs are in this language. Afrikaans and German are both widely used.

 

Personal Safety

Tourists in any country are a preferred target. Be on the alert for handbag snatchers and pickpockets. Exercise caution by keeping your vehicle locked, never leaving valuable/bags visible in the vehicle, using registered “car guards” when parking in towns. Leave cameras, electronic equipment, tickets passports and excess cash in the safe at your hotel when out sightseeing.

It is fairly safe, especially in a group, to walk in the city centre at night. Avoid unlit areas. Ensure that valuables and personal effects are adequately insured.

 

Public Transport

For transfers between Hosea Kutako (Windhoek) International Airport and the city, you can book with a shuttle operator; alternatively use one of the airport registered taxis. A number of companies operate bus services between main towns in Namibia and destinations in South Africa and Victoria Falls. They include Intercape Mainliner, Ekonolux, Town Hoppers and Baileys Transport.

Travel by train is possible up to Walvisbay in the west. Ondangwa in the north, Karasburg in the south and Gobabis in the east.

 

Time

Standard from the first Sunday in September to the first Sunday in April, Namibia reverts to GMT/UTC +2. The Caprivi Region stays on the same time as Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe. Namibian border posts with Botswana and South Africa adjust their operating hours to their neighbours’ time i.e. GMT/UTC +2. Daylight Saving: GMT/UTC +1 during winter starts from the first Sunday in April, and ends on the first Sunday in September.

 

VAT

All goods and services are priced to include VAT. Visitors may claim back VAT for goods purchased in Namibia at the Customs and Excise offices. Department of inland Revenue, in Windhoek. Further details can be obtained from the Ministry of Finance Information Centre by calling (02641) 2092642 or (026461) 2092644.

 

VISA Requirements

All visitors require a passport for entry into Namibia, which must be valid for at least 6 months beyond the intended stay in the county, and have sufficient pages for entry and exit stamps. All visitors must also have a valid return ticket.

Validity:
Visas are valid up to three months from the date of issue for stays of up to three months from date of entry. Extensions for a further three months are available from the Ministry of Home Affairs in Windhoek.

Applications
Consulate (or Consular section at High Commission); see Ministry of Foreign Affairs website.

Application Requirements:
(a) Valid passport
(b) Completed application form
(c) Two passport-size photos
(d) Return or onward ticket or proof of accommodation
(e) Fee
Private: (a)-(e) and, (f) Letter of invitation from Namibian resident.
Business: (a)-(e) and, (f) Company letter (g) Letter from sponsoring company in Namibia

Temporary Residence Permit:
Apply to the High Commission or Embassy; see Namibian Ministry of Foreign Affairs website.

* Please note that a minimum of three working days are required for processing applications

Click here to book now

or send an email to: info@harambeetravel.com

Duration: 23 days / 22 nights
Departure: On request
Pick-ups: Windhoek
Drop-off: Vic Falls
Minimum Participants: 10 Pax
Maximum Participants: 20 Pax
Mode of transport: Overlander Truck
Prices: Available on request
Options: Mixture of Lodges & Camping
Day 1 – Windhoek

Arrival at the International Airport, where you will be greeted by your english speaking driverguide. Transfer to Windhoek and check-in.

Upon arrival in the cosmopolitan city we will undertake city and township that will give us some exciting cultural experience.

We will enjoy our delicious dinner at rustic Joe’s Beerhouse, which is renowned for its finest cuisine.

Bed and breakfast, Windhoek Mountain Lodge or similar

 

Day 2 – Windhoek – Kalahari Desert

Breakfast and depart into the southern part of our country via Rehoboth to Kalahari Anib Lodge.

The Kalahari Desert forms a great part of the eastern side of Namibia. Because of its sandy ground it doesn’t allow enough water absorption into the soil. Due to the extremely high evaporation in this area, it is characterised as a Desert. In reality it is a lively wilderness and on the sparce grass plains you can see huge herds of antelopes and other animals grazing.

Today we will enjoy the nature drive on the amazing red dunes of kalahari desert and end the day with a sundowner.

Full board basis, Kalahari Anib Lodge or similar.

 

Day 3&4 – Kalahari – Fish river canyon

After an early breakfast, depart via Mariental and Keetmanshoop to your next destination.

Enroute you have the opportunity to visit the local Quiver Tree Forest and Giants Playground near Keetmanshoop.

About 14km north-west of Keetmanshoop on the farm Gariganus is the Quiver Tree Forest, a dense stand of quiver trees, some of which reach a height of 7m. The quiver tree’s name is derived from the Bushman practice of hollowing out the pithy insides of the branches and using the tough, outer casings of bark as quivers in which to keep their arrows.

During our two day stay we will explore the stunning fish river canyon.

The fish river canyon is the second largest canyon in the world. Set in a harsh, stony plain scantily covered with drought resistant succulents and the distinctive quiver tree or kokerboom, the canyon represents a spectacular natural phenomenon which took hundreds of millions of years to evolve into its current shape. While the full length of the canyon is 161 km, the most spectacular section is the 56 km long stretch which lies between the northernmost and southernmost viewpoints. Baboons, rock dassie’s, ground squirrel’s and klipspringer are commonly sighted in the canyon.

Fullboard basis, Canon Mountain Camp or similar

 

Day 5 Fish River – Sesriem Area

After breakfast departure via Seeheim, Aus, Helmeringhausen and Maltahöhe to our lodge.

We will continue via Aus and Duwisib Castle via Helmeringhausen en Maltahöhe to our lodge situated near Sesriem.

An intriguing feature of the southern Namib are the legendary desert horses which can be seen when travelling between Lüderitz and Aus. There are a number of theories regarding their origin, one of these and the most likely theory, is that they are descendants of horses left behind when the German “Schutztruppe’ abandoned Aus during the South West African Campaign in 1915. Here you will also find the remains of houses built during their imprisonment during World War I. About 1500 German Soldiers from the “Schutztruppe’ were kept here as prisoners.

The remainder of the afternoon can be spend at own leisure or you can relax at the swimming pool.

Fullboard basis, Betesda Lodge Campsite or similar

 

Day 6 –  Sossusvlei and Sesriem Canyon

After an early breakfast you will drive into the Namib Naukluft Park to visit one of the highest dunes in the world. The last 5 km will be driven with a 4×4 Shuttle.

This is a dune wonderland, with towering dunes up to 300m high surrounding a huge, dried-up pan. Dunes extend as far as the eye can see and their rich tints vary from pale apricot to vivid reds and oranges. During a good rainy season the Tsauchab River flows into the pan which creates a heaven for water birds. Even during the dry season, oryx, springbok and ostriches can be seen feeding off the sparse vegetation along the water course.

At the entrance to Sossusvlei is Sesriem Canyon, where centuries of erosion have incised a narrow gorge about 1 km in length. At the foot of the gorge, which plunges down for 30m to 40m, are deep pools of water which become replenished after good rains. Sesriem derives its name from the time when early pioneers tied six lenghts of rawhide thongs together to draw water from these pools.

Late afternoon return to the lodge and enjoy the rest of the afternoon at own leisure.

Fullboard basis, Betesda Lodge campsite or similar

 

Day 7 –  Sesriem – Swakopmund

Today you will drive through the Desert via Walvis Bay to Swakopmund.

One of the oldest deserts in the world, maybe the very oldest, the Namib was already arid at least 80 million years ago. In the south it extends into South Africa, across the Orange River, while in the north it crosses the Kunene into Angola. The greater part of the Namib lies inside Namibia, where it occupies some 1500km of Atlantic coastline. In width it generally varies between 80 and 140 km, but in places reaches inland for as much as 200 km.

Swakopmund is much loved by Namibians as a welcome respite from the inland heat. It is also popular amongst visitors because of its old-world charm and relaxed atmosphere. Founded in 1892 during the period of German colonial rule, it served as the territory’s main harbour for many years. The distinct German colonial character has been well preserved and today many of the old buildings serve a useful purpose.The Woermann House (1905) now houses an art gallery. The Woermann Tower was used in earlier times to see if ships came into the harbour. Other old interesting buildings are: “Die Alte Kaserne”, “Hohenzollern Haus”and the Railway Station Building

Fullboard basis, Dorm accommodation in Amanpuri Lodge or similar

 

Day 8 –  Swakopmund

You have the whole of today at own leisure to explore this coastal town on your own.

Alternatively you can take part in many optional acitivities on offer. Activities like: boat cruises, Catamaran cruises, dolphine cruise, quadbiking, sky-diving, Living Desert Tour, Township tours, Scenic flights etc. Etc. More information upon arrival in Namibia.

Fullboard basis, Dorm accommodation in Amanpuri Lodge or similar

 

Day 9 – Swakopmund – Brandberg

After a hearty breakfast departure via Henties Bay and Uis to Brandberg White Lady Lodge.

En route we will visit Cape Cross which is a home of seals.

The largest and best known of the 23 breeding colonies of Cape fur seals along the coast of South Africa and Namibia is the Cape Cross Seal Reserve north of Swakopmund. During the November/December breeding season as many as 200 000 seals gather at Cape Cross. It was here that the Portuguese navigator, Diego Cao, erected a stone cross in 1486. Also at Cape Cross is a small lichen reserve where a relatively large variety of these interesting and slow-growing organisms are protected.

Afterwards depart to Uis and arrival at our campsite. With the help of our assistant guide we will put on our tents.

Followed by a delicious dinner around the fire.

Fullboard basis, Brandberg White Lady lodge campsite or similar

 

Day 10 – Brandberg

Today we will visit the impressive Brandberg mountain which is the highest in Namibia.

The imposing Brandberg massif is a challenge to rock climbers, especially its peak “Königstein”, which at 2573m is the highest peak in Namibia. While its name is Afrikaans for “burnt mountain” the Brandberg is most famous for the rock painting known as the “White Lady”, which is painted on an overhang in Maack’s Shelter – named after the surveyor who discovered it in 1917. Maack’s Shelter lies in the Tsisab gorge, a wild and beautiful ravine amongst a vast jumble of rocks, remnants of many ancient landslides.

Return to the campsite and you may take part on the activities on offer.

Fullboard basis, Brandberg White Lady campsite or similar

 

Day 11 & 12 – Brandberg – Damaraland

After breakfast our journey continues today to enchanting Damaralnd.

During our two day stay we will have an opportunity to visit Organ pipes and burnt mountains, twyfelfontein and Damara living museum.

South of Twyfelfontein is the Burnt Mountain, a panorama of desolation with coloured rocks contrasting vividly against the grey-black surroundings. The Organ Pipes, a mass of basalt slabs in a ravine gouged out by a river, is another geological curiosity in the area.

Twyfelfontein, meaning doubtful fountain, which lies to the west of Khorixas, resembles a large, open-air art gallery. This treasure house of rock engravings left by stone-age artists is regarded as one of the richest collections in Africa.

Fullboard basis, Aba Huab Campsite or similar

 

Day 13 – Damaraland – Etosha

Departure via Khorixas, Kamanjab and Outjo to direction of Etosha Nationalpark.

En route we will visit petrified forest and continue our journey to Kamanjab where we will have an opportunity to visit himba village.

The Himba are semi-nomadic people and are one of the most photographed ethnic groups of Namibia due to their unique appearance, The Himba women have a particularly distinctive appearance and can take several hours for beauty care every morning rubbing their body with a cream consisting of butterfat and ochre powder which gives the body a reddish tinge. There are about 20, 000 to 50,000 Himba people living in northern Namibia, in the Kunene region. They speak the same language as the Herero and predominantly breed cattle and goats. Clothes, hairstyle and jewellery are all of particular significance to the Himba.

We will arrive in Etosha National park and undertake our first game drive with our own truck in the park.

Fullboard basis, Okaukuejo Campsite or similar

 

Day 14  – Full day game drive in Etosha National park

Today is dedicated for full day game drive into Etosha National park with our truck until we will reach our campsite situated near von Lindequist gate.

The Etosha National Park, consisting of 22 270 sq km of saline desert, savannah and woodlands, is one of the largest parks in Africa. Its definitive feature is the Etosha Pan, a vast, shallow depression of approximately 5000 sq km. For the greater part of the year, the pan is a bleak expanse of white cracked mud which shimmers with mirages on most days. It is seeing vast herds of game with this eerie “great white place of dry water” as a backdrop which makes the Etosha experience unique. A total of about 114 mammal species are found in the park, including several rare and endangered, such as black rhino and black-faced impala. About 300 bird species occur in the park, of which approximately one third are migratory, including the European bee-eater and several species of waders.

Fullboard basis, Namutoni Camp or similar

 

Day 15  –  Etosha – Roy’s Camp

Early breakfast and we will depart for the bushmen village near Tsintsabis, where we can learn more about the culture of the San people.

Afterwards we will continue via Tsumeb and Grootfontein to Roy’s Camp.

The town of Tsumeb, gateway to the north, has been closely linked to the mining industry since 1905. The history of Tsumeb is depicted in the Tsumeb museum, where a comprehensive collection of rare minerals can be viewed. In the Khorab room a collection of restored cannons and other armaments, which were dumped into Lake Otjikoto by the German forces, are displayed.

The largest known meteorite in the world, the Hoba Meteorite, lies in a shallow depression on the farm Hoba-West about 20km west of Grootfontein. The 50t mass of nickel and iron, which is between 100 million and 300 million years old, crashed on earth some 30 000 to 80 000 years ago. Discovered by Jacobus Hermanus Brits in the 1920s, it was periodically subjected to vandalism.

Tonight we will enjoy delicious dinner around the fire at our campsite.

Fullboard basis, Roy’s Campsite or similar

 

 Day 16 & 17 – Roy’s Camp – Rundu

Leisure breakfast before we start our journey to direction of Rundu to our destination.

Rundu, the capital of the Kavango Region, is 248 km northeast of Grootfontein. Situated on a high bank, the town overlooks the Kavango River and the derelict settlement of Calai in Angola. It is also the home of Namibia’s well-known Kavango woodcarvers.

We will undertake sunset cruise on the banks of Okavango river on the day of arrival.

Fullboard basis, N’kwazi Campsite or similar

 

Day 18  – Rundu – Kongola

Departure via Bagani and Divundu to our lodge near Kongola.

En route will have a chance to visit Popa Falls with its breathtaking views.

The name Popa Falls conjures up images of a raging waterfall, so little wonder that first-time visitors are disappointed when the “falls” turn out to be nothing more than a series of rapids. A quartzite ledge that obstructs the flow of the river across its 1,2 km width creates the rapids. Here, the river splits into numerous channels, separated by small islands, to form a series of cascades with a total drop of about 4 m.

We will continue via Caprivi Strip to our lodge.

Fullboard basis, Namushasha Campsite or similar

 

Day 19  – Bwafata National Park

Today is dedicated for the game drive and boatcruise in Bwafata Nationalpark with our own truck.

Bwabwata National park – formerly the Caprivi Game Park – includes 5 main zones, the West Caprivi Triangle around Kongola, the Mahango Game Reserve, Popa Falls, the Buffalo Core Area near Divundu and the West Caprivi Game Reserve. Known as the “people park” as it supports both large wildlife and human populations. The Bwabwata National park is a sanctuary to 35 large and numerous small game species and as many as 339 bird species. Bwabwata aims to rehabilitate wildlife populations that were virtually destroyed by poaching. The landscape is generally flat with patchy vegetation-covered dunes. Dominating trees of the area include wild seringa, copalwood, Zambezi teak, wild teak, wild raisin species, and bushwillow.

Fullboard basis, Namushasha Campsite or similar

 

Day 20 –   Chobe National Park

After we enjoyed our delicious breakfast we dedicate this morning for a game drive in open vehicle into Chobe National park.

Well over 400 of Namibia’s bird species occur in this part of the country and the region is steadily gaining a reputation as a retreat for bird – watchers, nature lovers and specialist travellers. It is also a growing interest to scientists studying the wetlands system and its flora and fauna. Sunset river cruises, photo safaris, swamp safaris, boating, a trip in a mokoro or dug out canoe and game viewing either in 4×4 vehicles or by boat are available for holidaymakers in this region.

The remainder of the afternoon can be spend at own leisure.

Fullboard basis, Senyati Safari Campsite

 

Day 21 – Chobe – Vic Falls

Todays journey will takes us leisurely via Kazangula and Seseke to Vic Falls.

We will visit this stunning Victoria falls that will give you really a breathtaking moments.

Victoria Falls, one of the Seven Wonders of the World, is the largest sheet of falling water. In full flood some 500 million litres of water cascade downwards at a speed of 100 meters per minute, causing a thunderous roar and towering columns of spray, hence the local name “mosi – u – tunya” meaning the smoke that thunders.Vic Falls is one of the top tourist destinations in the world. It has the wildest one day white water rafting trips on the planet and until recently the highest commercial bungee jump on earth.

Dinner, bed and breakfast, The Kingdoms Hotel

 

 Day 22  – Departure

Until your airport transfer the remainder of the day can be spend at own leisure.

 
Day Accommodation Meals
Day 1 Windhoek Mountain Lodge D,B
Day 2 Kalahari Anib Lodge L,D,B
Day 3 Canon Mountain Camp L,D,B
Day 4 Canon Mountain Camp L,D,B
Day 5 Betesda Lodge L,D,B
Day 6 Betesda Lodge L,D,B
Day 7 Amanpuri Lodge L,D,B
Day 8 Amanpuri Lodge L,D,B
Day 9 Brandberg White Lady L,D,B
Day 10 Brandberg White Lady L,D,B
Day 11 Aba Huab L,D,B
Day 12 Aba Huab L,D,B
Day 13 Okaukuejo L,D,B
Day 14 Namutoni L,D,B
Day 15 Roy’s Camp L,D,B
Day 16 N’kwazi Lodge L,D,B
Day 17 N’kwazi Lodge L,D,B
Day 18 Namushasha Lodge L,D,B
Day 19 Namushasha Lodge L,D,B
Day 20 Senyati Safari Camp L,D,B
Day 21 Senyati Safari Camp L,D,B
Day 22 The Kingdom Hotel L,D,B
Day 23 Departure B
 
Included in the tour’s price:
Vehicle Fuel – Qualified professional Driverguide = 1 Person
Accommodation
Accommodation & Meals for the Guide
Meals (as per itinerary)
Park entrance fees as per itinerary
Activities as indicated in the itinerary
Water on board
Porterage
Passenger Liability’
15% VAT
2% Tourism Levy
Not included in the tour’s price:
All expenses of personal nature
Entrance fees not mentioned in the itinerary
All meals not mentioned above
Drinks at lodges and on road
All optional excursions and activities
Airport transfers
Tips for tour guides
International flights and airport taxes
Items not mentioned in the itinerary
  1. Sightseeing tour in Windhoek
  2. Sundowner Drive
  3. Quivertree forest and giants playground
  4. Fish River Canyon
  5. Visit to Duwisib Castle
  6. Sossusvlei & Sesriem Canyon
  7. Welwitschia Mirabillis and Moon landscape
  8. Day at own leisure
  9. Cape Cross
  10. Guided tour to Brandberg Mountain
  11. Scenic drive to Damaraland
  12. Twyfelfontein, organ pipes and burnt Mountain
  13. Petried forest and visit to Himba village near Kamanjab
  14. Full day game drive in Etosha National Park
  15. Visit Bushmen village and sightseeing at Hoba Meteorite
  16. Sunset cruise at N’kwazi Lodge
  17. Optional activities
  18. En route visit Popa Falls and drive through Caprivi Strip
  19. Game Drive and Boatcruise in Bwafata National Park
  20. Boatcruise at Chobe River
  21. Game Drive in open vehicle in Chobe Park
  22. Tour of the Vic Falls
  23. Transfer to Vic falls airport for your return flight
Climate

Winter (May to September) Temperatures in the interior range from 18˚C to 25˚C during the day. Below freezing temperatures and ground frosts are common at night.

Summer (October to April) Average interior temperatures range from 20˚C to 34˚C during the day .Temperatures above 40˚C is often recorded in the extreme north and south of the country.

The coast influenced by the cold Benguela current, boasts a relatively stable range of 15˚C to 25˚C. Heavy fog is fairly common at night.

Humidity is generally very low in most parts of Namibia, but it can reach as high as 80% in the extreme north during summer.

The rainy season is from October to April. Average annual rainfall varies from less than 50mm along the coast to 350 mm in the central interior and 700 mm in the Caprivi. The sporadic rains do not affect road travel significantly, however, tourists should exercise caution when crossing or camping in riverbeds during the rainy season, as flash floods are common.

Visitors should pack both warm and cold weather clothing for any visit to Namibia. Windhoek boasts a number of excellent safari outfitters and tourists are advised to shop for clothing upon arrival. Hats, sunglasses, lip balm, moisturizer and sunblock are essential when visiting Namibia.

 

Drinking Water

Tap water is safe and palatable in Namibia, unless specifically stated at particular location. Tourists travelling by road are advised to carry sufficient water at all times. Mineral water and ice are readily available at most service stations and shops.

 

Credit cards

We accept major credit cards such as Credit/Debit Card: American Express, Diners Club, MasterCard and Visa. Check with your credit or debit card company for details of merchant acceptability and other services, which may be available. Please note, service stations do not accept credit for petrol. Plan accordingly.

 

Currency

The Namibia Dollar (N$) and the South African Rand are the only legal tender in Namibia. The two currencies are on par. Foreign currency, travellers and personal cheques can be converted to the Namibian Dollar at any bank or Bureau de Change.

 

Duty Free Import

Visitors may import duty free 400 Cigarettes or 50 Cigars or 250g Pipe Tobacco, 2 litres Wine, 1 litre Spirit or other alcoholic beverages, 50 ml Perfume, 250 ml Toiletry Water.

 

Electrical Appliances

All run on 220/240 volts. Outlets are of the round 3 pin, 15 amp type.

 

Firearms

Handguns are not permitted in Namibia. Only properly licensed hunting rifles with valid permits for Namibia are permitted. Licenses and permits should be applied for well in advance, as attempting to do so at the border is a lengthy process. Hunting rifles are not permitted in Botswana, and have to be carried sealed if in transit to Namibia. All arms and ammunition should be declared even if in possession of a valid South African permit.

 

Health

Medical services in Namibia are of a very high standard. However, the availability of most services is restricted to the main towns. Emergencies and accidents occurring in remote areas do attract a high cost when transport to the main towns is required. Host establishments should be able to organize these services when requested.

The north of Namibia, including Etosha National Park, is a malaria-endemic area. Travellers are advised to have the necessary medication/prophylaxis and also carry insect repellents and sprays. Please consult a local doctor or pharmacist on the correct prophylactics for the specific area of entry. Blood in Namibia is donated by selected, unpaid volunteer. The Blood Transfusion Service of Namibia screens all blood products for transmissible diseases including hepatitis and AIDS. An insurance service for tourists is available from rescue companies providing one to three months coverage for emergency transport.

 

Language

The official language is English. All documents, notices and signs are in this language. Afrikaans and German are both widely used.

 

Personal Safety

Tourists in any country are a preferred target. Be on the alert for handbag snatchers and pickpockets. Exercise caution by keeping your vehicle locked, never leaving valuable/bags visible in the vehicle, using registered “car guards” when parking in towns. Leave cameras, electronic equipment, tickets passports and excess cash in the safe at your hotel when out sightseeing.

It is fairly safe, especially in a group, to walk in the city centre at night. Avoid unlit areas. Ensure that valuables and personal effects are adequately insured.

 

Public Transport

For transfers between Hosea Kutako (Windhoek) International Airport and the city, you can book with a shuttle operator; alternatively use one of the airport registered taxis. A number of companies operate bus services between main towns in Namibia and destinations in South Africa and Victoria Falls. They include Intercape Mainliner, Ekonolux, Town Hoppers and Baileys Transport.

Travel by train is possible up to Walvisbay in the west. Ondangwa in the north, Karasburg in the south and Gobabis in the east.

 

Time

Standard from the first Sunday in September to the first Sunday in April, Namibia reverts to GMT/UTC +2. The Caprivi Region stays on the same time as Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe. Namibian border posts with Botswana and South Africa adjust their operating hours to their neighbours’ time i.e. GMT/UTC +2. Daylight Saving: GMT/UTC +1 during winter starts from the first Sunday in April, and ends on the first Sunday in September.

 

VAT

All goods and services are priced to include VAT. Visitors may claim back VAT for goods purchased in Namibia at the Customs and Excise offices. Department of inland Revenue, in Windhoek. Further details can be obtained from the Ministry of Finance Information Centre by calling (02641) 2092642 or (026461) 2092644.

 

VISA Requirements

All visitors require a passport for entry into Namibia, which must be valid for at least 6 months beyond the intended stay in the county, and have sufficient pages for entry and exit stamps. All visitors must also have a valid return ticket.

Validity:
Visas are valid up to three months from the date of issue for stays of up to three months from date of entry. Extensions for a further three months are available from the Ministry of Home Affairs in Windhoek.

Applications
Consulate (or Consular section at High Commission); see Ministry of Foreign Affairs website.

Application Requirements:
(a) Valid passport
(b) Completed application form
(c) Two passport-size photos
(d) Return or onward ticket or proof of accommodation
(e) Fee
Private: (a)-(e) and, (f) Letter of invitation from Namibian resident.
Business: (a)-(e) and, (f) Company letter (g) Letter from sponsoring company in Namibia

Temporary Residence Permit:
Apply to the High Commission or Embassy; see Namibian Ministry of Foreign Affairs website.

* Please note that a minimum of three working days are required for processing applications

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