+264 811295024 info@harambeetravel.com

Namibia Discovery Guided Tour

15 Days
  • Sossusvlei, Dead Vlei & Sesriem Canyon
  • Gaub and the Kuiseb canyon, Welwitschia plains, Walvis Bay Lagoon
  • Epupa Falls
  • Himba Village Visit
  • Petrified Forest
  • Twyfelfontein, Burnt Mountain
  • Organ Pipes, Damara Living Museum.
Day 1. Windhoek

After your arrival at the Windhoek International Airport, your guide will be waiting for you in the arrival hall. From here we will travel via mountainous terrain to Windhoek, the capital city of Namibia. With roughly 350’000 inhabitants Windhoek constitutes the largest city in the country and is situated in a lush and scenically appealing valley of the Auas Mountains, Namibia’s second highest mountain range. Due to its central location, the city serves as the perfect vantage point to Namibia’s vast array of tourist destinations. The city is a kaleidoscope of modern and traditional cultures, fashions and architectural styles. Overnight: River crossing Lodge.

 

Day 2, 3 – Sossusvlei

After an early breakfast we will be travelling south westerly along stretches of grass plains interspersed with huge mountain ranges into the Namib Desert – the oldest desert on earth, formed by the effect of the cold Benguela Current. Due to early morning fog, this arid desert becomes a life supporting structure for all its living organisms. We will find ourselves in the vicinity of Sossusvlei, an area marked by some of the highest dunes on earth. Sossusvlei’s monumentally high dunes are a sought after topic for photographers. With their warm tints ranging from pale apricot to brick orange and deep red, they contrast vividly with the large white clay pans at their basis. Overnight: Namib Desert Lodge.

Day 4, 5 – Swakopmund

Travelling via the desolate, rolling hills of the Kuiseb Moon Valley towards the Atlantic Ocean, in Walvisbay you can visit the shallow lagoon, one of the most important wetland areas on the African continent. From here you will travel to Swakopmund. Better known as Namibia’s playground, this idyllic town is wedged between the sweltering Namib Desert and cold Atlantic Ocean. This desert town is a rhapsody of adventure, fun, exploration and relaxation. Graced with many beautiful, old buildings in a colonial, Bavarian style, the best way to experience this small town is on foot. You can embrace the relaxed pace of this idyllic coastal town whilst enjoying coffee and freshly baked pastries in one of the many street café’s or bakeries. Overnight: Swakopmund Guesthouse.

Day 6 – Damaraland

After breakfast depart from Swakopmund were your journey proceeds inland past the Brandberg, Namibia’s highest mountain (2579m) into Damaraland. This part of Namibia belongs to one of the least populated and most geologically diverse areas in Africa and is home to the rare desert elephant and the black rhino. Prior to checking into your lodge, you can visit Twyfelfontein, Burnt Mountain, and Organ Pipes & Petrified Forest to experience these geological phenomena. Overnight: Damara Mopane Lodge.

Day 7 – Kaokoland

After breakfast, we travel to the Succulent Karoo Desert in search of the wild horses of the Namib Desert. Originating from the Second World War these have managed to adapt to the harsh conditions of the desert and represent one of the only very few wild horse population. After winter rains, this desert unfolds in a carpet of flowers and an explosion of bright colours. It is one of the 20 most important biomes in the world and counts as the most specie diverse desert on earth. As an optional activity, we will explore the sweeping desert plains with its miscellany of organisms on a nature drive in the late afternoon. Overnight: Klein Aus Vista Desert Horse Inn.

Day 8, 9 Kaokoland

After breakfast we will depart from Opuwo and travel further north, you may encounter Springbok, Ostrich, Kudu and huge Baobab Trees that stand like giants in the midst of the Mopane Savanna. Once at the spectacular Epupa Falls, this water wonderland in an arid environment will have you gasping in awe. Your lodge is situated close to the falls themselves, which delve into a 35 meter gauge and create one of Namibia’s most celebrated pictures.

You have the day at leisure. Taking pictures of the falls is particularly rewarding during the early morning and the late evening when the low sun accentuates the gushing mist rising high into the air. Other optional activities at your lodge include scenic walks, excellent birding opportunities and canoe trips to explore this pristine area from the water. Overnight: Epupa Camp.

Day 10 Ruacana

After breakfast we depart from Epupa and drive north westerly along the borders to Ruacana. Ruacana is a town in the Omusati Region of northern Namibia, set on the border with Angola on the Kunene River. Ruacana Eha Lodge is situated in the town of Ruacana, known for the picturesque Ruacana Falls only 20kms away. The town provides the perfect passageway to Kaokoland, Etosha National Park and Epupa Falls. Here the vibrant African culture of the surrounding Omusati, Oshana, Ohangwena and Oshikoto regions can be experienced firsthand.

Ruacana Eha Lodge in northern Namibia is a natural gateway to the wonders of the Kaokoveld, the Etosha National Park, the Epupa falls and the vibrant African culture of the Omusati, Oshana, Ohangwena and Oshikoto regions.

This glittering oasis in the rugged landscapes, offers relaxation, conferencing and opportunity to come face-to-face with forgotten Africa.

The Himba people lead a nomadic existence, following the rain and grazing with their herds of cattle and livestock. Many of the Himba and Owambo still live in the traditions of their fore-fathers, while others are adopting western ways. Overnight: Ruacana Eha Lodge.

 

Day 11, 12, 13 – Etosha National Park

This morning we will be travelling south to the world-renowned Etosha National Park. This unique, 22’270km²large area consists of wide-open plains and dense bush savannah that surround a parched salt desert known as the Etosha Pan. This desolate saline depression shimmers with terrestrial heat during the hotter parts of the day, and is surrounded by a number of waterholes that ensure the survival of 114 different game, as well as 340 different bird species. Wait in anticipation at a selection of waterholes that supp ort a rich diversity of mammals and birds. Some of these include rare and endangered species such as black-faced Impala, Roan, Black Rhino as well as the Elusive Eland, the largest antelope on earth. Each waterhole visited holds a surprise as no game drive is ever the same and we keep our eyes permanently peeled to try and glimpse the trunk of the elephant, the yellow eyes of the lion or the chequered face of the leopard behind the next bush. Overnight: Okaukuejo Camp – 1st night Halali Camp – 2nd night Namutoni Camp – 3rd night.

 

Day 14 – Waterberg

After breakfast we will depart from Etosha National Park and drive to Waterberg Plateau via Tsumeb, Otavi and Otjiwarongo.

The Waterberg Plateau is a particularly prominent location, elevating high above the plains of the Kalahari of Eastern Namibia. Waterberg Park and some 405 km² of surrounding land were declared a Nature Reserve in 1972. The plateau is largely inaccessible so in the early 1970s several of Namibia’s endangered species were soon translocated there to protect them from predators and poaching to extinction. The programme was very successful and Waterberg now supplies other Namibian parks with rare animals. In 1989, black rhinoceros was reintroduced to the area from Damaraland. Overnight: Waterberg Camp.

 

Day 15 – Departure

After breakfast travel south towards Windhoek. After strolling through one of the large craft markets in Okahandja, your route takes you between high mountain ranges back to the capital city, Windhoek, and from here travel to the Windhoek International Airport for your outbound flight.

Tourists should book accommodation well in advance, especially for school holidays, when demand peaks. Please note, that not all accommodation establishments accept children under the age of 12 years or 16 years. Please check if you intend taking children.

Select one, preferred type of accommodation or we can design tailor-made, mixed-accommodation tour:

  • two/three-star lodges
  • luxury lodges and hotels
  • camping/tented

Double rooms with an option of a single supplement. Air-conditioned rooms with private bathrooms. Camping tour: tented accommodation in 2-persons tents.

Included in the tour’s price:

Transportation/fuel, accommodation (or tents/camping equipment), meals as per itinerary, national park entrance fee, tour guide for the entire tour, transfer ‚to and from’ the airport, pick-up in Windhoek and guests’ transfer to the lodge/hotel after the tour.

Not included in the tour’s price:

Scheduled flights (bus tickets) ‚to and from’ Namibia, individually extended accommodation or additional transfers, sleeping bags on camping tours, compulsory insurance, water and drinks, alcoholic beverages, optional activities/attractions, snacks, gratuities and tips, trip extensions, personal shopping, visa to Namibia.

Climate

Winter (May to September) Temperatures in the interior range from 18˚C to 25˚C during the day. Below freezing temperatures and ground frosts are common at night.

Summer (October to April) Average interior temperatures range from 20˚C to 34˚C during the day .Temperatures above 40˚C is often recorded in the extreme north and south of the country.

The coast influenced by the cold Benguela current, boasts a relatively stable range of 15˚C to 25˚C. Heavy fog is fairly common at night.

Humidity is generally very low in most parts of Namibia, but it can reach as high as 80% in the extreme north during summer.

The rainy season is from October to April. Average annual rainfall varies from less than 50mm along the coast to 350 mm in the central interior and 700 mm in the Caprivi. The sporadic rains do not affect road travel significantly, however, tourists should exercise caution when crossing or camping in riverbeds during the rainy season, as flash floods are common.

Visitors should pack both warm and cold weather clothing for any visit to Namibia. Windhoek boasts a number of excellent safari outfitters and tourists are advised to shop for clothing upon arrival. Hats, sunglasses, lip balm, moisturizer and sunblock are essential when visiting Namibia.

 

Drinking Water

Tap water is safe and palatable in Namibia, unless specifically stated at particular location. Tourists travelling by road are advised to carry sufficient water at all times. Mineral water and ice are readily available at most service stations and shops.

 

Credit cards

We accept major credit cards such as Credit/Debit Card: American Express, Diners Club, MasterCard and Visa. Check with your credit or debit card company for details of merchant acceptability and other services, which may be available. Please note, service stations do not accept credit for petrol. Plan accordingly.

 

Currency

The Namibia Dollar (N$) and the South African Rand are the only legal tender in Namibia. The two currencies are on par. Foreign currency, travellers and personal cheques can be converted to the Namibian Dollar at any bank or Bureau de Change.

 

Duty Free Import

Visitors may import duty free 400 Cigarettes or 50 Cigars or 250g Pipe Tobacco, 2 litres Wine, 1 litre Spirit or other alcoholic beverages, 50 ml Perfume, 250 ml Toiletry Water.

 

Electrical Appliances

All run on 220/240 volts. Outlets are of the round 3 pin, 15 amp type.

 

Firearms

Handguns are not permitted in Namibia. Only properly licensed hunting rifles with valid permits for Namibia are permitted. Licenses and permits should be applied for well in advance, as attempting to do so at the border is a lengthy process. Hunting rifles are not permitted in Botswana, and have to be carried sealed if in transit to Namibia. All arms and ammunition should be declared even if in possession of a valid South African permit.

 

Health

Medical services in Namibia are of a very high standard. However, the availability of most services is restricted to the main towns. Emergencies and accidents occurring in remote areas do attract a high cost when transport to the main towns is required. Host establishments should be able to organize these services when requested.

The north of Namibia, including Etosha National Park, is a malaria-endemic area. Travellers are advised to have the necessary medication/prophylaxis and also carry insect repellents and sprays. Please consult a local doctor or pharmacist on the correct prophylactics for the specific area of entry. Blood in Namibia is donated by selected, unpaid volunteer. The Blood Transfusion Service of Namibia screens all blood products for transmissible diseases including hepatitis and AIDS. An insurance service for tourists is available from rescue companies providing one to three months coverage for emergency transport.

 

Language

The official language is English. All documents, notices and signs are in this language. Afrikaans and German are both widely used.

 

Personal Safety

Tourists in any country are a preferred target. Be on the alert for handbag snatchers and pickpockets. Exercise caution by keeping your vehicle locked, never leaving valuable/bags visible in the vehicle, using registered “car guards” when parking in towns. Leave cameras, electronic equipment, tickets passports and excess cash in the safe at your hotel when out sightseeing.

It is fairly safe, especially in a group, to walk in the city centre at night. Avoid unlit areas. Ensure that valuables and personal effects are adequately insured.

 

Public Transport

For transfers between Hosea Kutako (Windhoek) International Airport and the city, you can book with a shuttle operator; alternatively use one of the airport registered taxis. A number of companies operate bus services between main towns in Namibia and destinations in South Africa and Victoria Falls. They include Intercape Mainliner, Ekonolux, Town Hoppers and Baileys Transport.

Travel by train is possible up to Walvisbay in the west. Ondangwa in the north, Karasburg in the south and Gobabis in the east.

 

Time

Standard from the first Sunday in September to the first Sunday in April, Namibia reverts to GMT/UTC +2. The Caprivi Region stays on the same time as Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe. Namibian border posts with Botswana and South Africa adjust their operating hours to their neighbours’ time i.e. GMT/UTC +2. Daylight Saving: GMT/UTC +1 during winter starts from the first Sunday in April, and ends on the first Sunday in September.

 

VAT

All goods and services are priced to include VAT. Visitors may claim back VAT for goods purchased in Namibia at the Customs and Excise offices. Department of inland Revenue, in Windhoek. Further details can be obtained from the Ministry of Finance Information Centre by calling (02641) 2092642 or (026461) 2092644.

 

VISA Requirements

All visitors require a passport for entry into Namibia, which must be valid for at least 6 months beyond the intended stay in the county, and have sufficient pages for entry and exit stamps. All visitors must also have a valid return ticket.

Validity:
Visas are valid up to three months from the date of issue for stays of up to three months from date of entry. Extensions for a further three months are available from the Ministry of Home Affairs in Windhoek.

Applications
Consulate (or Consular section at High Commission); see Ministry of Foreign Affairs website.

Application Requirements:
(a) Valid passport
(b) Completed application form
(c) Two passport-size photos
(d) Return or onward ticket or proof of accommodation
(e) Fee
Private: (a)-(e) and, (f) Letter of invitation from Namibian resident.
Business: (a)-(e) and, (f) Company letter (g) Letter from sponsoring company in Namibia

Temporary Residence Permit:
Apply to the High Commission or Embassy; see Namibian Ministry of Foreign Affairs website.

* Please note that a minimum of three working days are required for processing applications

Click here to book now

or send an email to: info@harambeetravel.com

  • Sossusvlei, Dead Vlei & Sesriem Canyon
  • Gaub and the Kuiseb canyon, Welwitschia plains, Walvis Bay Lagoon
  • Epupa Falls
  • Himba Village Visit
  • Petrified Forest
  • Twyfelfontein, Burnt Mountain
  • Organ Pipes, Damara Living Museum.
Day 1. Windhoek

After your arrival at the Windhoek International Airport, your guide will be waiting for you in the arrival hall. From here we will travel via mountainous terrain to Windhoek, the capital city of Namibia. With roughly 350’000 inhabitants Windhoek constitutes the largest city in the country and is situated in a lush and scenically appealing valley of the Auas Mountains, Namibia’s second highest mountain range. Due to its central location, the city serves as the perfect vantage point to Namibia’s vast array of tourist destinations. The city is a kaleidoscope of modern and traditional cultures, fashions and architectural styles. Overnight: River crossing Lodge.

 

Day 2, 3 – Sossusvlei

After an early breakfast we will be travelling south westerly along stretches of grass plains interspersed with huge mountain ranges into the Namib Desert – the oldest desert on earth, formed by the effect of the cold Benguela Current. Due to early morning fog, this arid desert becomes a life supporting structure for all its living organisms. We will find ourselves in the vicinity of Sossusvlei, an area marked by some of the highest dunes on earth. Sossusvlei’s monumentally high dunes are a sought after topic for photographers. With their warm tints ranging from pale apricot to brick orange and deep red, they contrast vividly with the large white clay pans at their basis. Overnight: Namib Desert Lodge.

Day 4, 5 – Swakopmund

Travelling via the desolate, rolling hills of the Kuiseb Moon Valley towards the Atlantic Ocean, in Walvisbay you can visit the shallow lagoon, one of the most important wetland areas on the African continent. From here you will travel to Swakopmund. Better known as Namibia’s playground, this idyllic town is wedged between the sweltering Namib Desert and cold Atlantic Ocean. This desert town is a rhapsody of adventure, fun, exploration and relaxation. Graced with many beautiful, old buildings in a colonial, Bavarian style, the best way to experience this small town is on foot. You can embrace the relaxed pace of this idyllic coastal town whilst enjoying coffee and freshly baked pastries in one of the many street café’s or bakeries. Overnight: Swakopmund Guesthouse.

Day 6 – Damaraland

After breakfast depart from Swakopmund were your journey proceeds inland past the Brandberg, Namibia’s highest mountain (2579m) into Damaraland. This part of Namibia belongs to one of the least populated and most geologically diverse areas in Africa and is home to the rare desert elephant and the black rhino. Prior to checking into your lodge, you can visit Twyfelfontein, Burnt Mountain, and Organ Pipes & Petrified Forest to experience these geological phenomena. Overnight: Damara Mopane Lodge.

Day 7 – Kaokoland

After breakfast, we travel to the Succulent Karoo Desert in search of the wild horses of the Namib Desert. Originating from the Second World War these have managed to adapt to the harsh conditions of the desert and represent one of the only very few wild horse population. After winter rains, this desert unfolds in a carpet of flowers and an explosion of bright colours. It is one of the 20 most important biomes in the world and counts as the most specie diverse desert on earth. As an optional activity, we will explore the sweeping desert plains with its miscellany of organisms on a nature drive in the late afternoon. Overnight: Klein Aus Vista Desert Horse Inn.

Day 8, 9 Kaokoland

After breakfast we will depart from Opuwo and travel further north, you may encounter Springbok, Ostrich, Kudu and huge Baobab Trees that stand like giants in the midst of the Mopane Savanna. Once at the spectacular Epupa Falls, this water wonderland in an arid environment will have you gasping in awe. Your lodge is situated close to the falls themselves, which delve into a 35 meter gauge and create one of Namibia’s most celebrated pictures.

You have the day at leisure. Taking pictures of the falls is particularly rewarding during the early morning and the late evening when the low sun accentuates the gushing mist rising high into the air. Other optional activities at your lodge include scenic walks, excellent birding opportunities and canoe trips to explore this pristine area from the water. Overnight: Epupa Camp.

Day 10 Ruacana

After breakfast we depart from Epupa and drive north westerly along the borders to Ruacana. Ruacana is a town in the Omusati Region of northern Namibia, set on the border with Angola on the Kunene River. Ruacana Eha Lodge is situated in the town of Ruacana, known for the picturesque Ruacana Falls only 20kms away. The town provides the perfect passageway to Kaokoland, Etosha National Park and Epupa Falls. Here the vibrant African culture of the surrounding Omusati, Oshana, Ohangwena and Oshikoto regions can be experienced firsthand.

Ruacana Eha Lodge in northern Namibia is a natural gateway to the wonders of the Kaokoveld, the Etosha National Park, the Epupa falls and the vibrant African culture of the Omusati, Oshana, Ohangwena and Oshikoto regions.

This glittering oasis in the rugged landscapes, offers relaxation, conferencing and opportunity to come face-to-face with forgotten Africa.

The Himba people lead a nomadic existence, following the rain and grazing with their herds of cattle and livestock. Many of the Himba and Owambo still live in the traditions of their fore-fathers, while others are adopting western ways. Overnight: Ruacana Eha Lodge.

 

Day 11, 12, 13 – Etosha National Park

This morning we will be travelling south to the world-renowned Etosha National Park. This unique, 22’270km²large area consists of wide-open plains and dense bush savannah that surround a parched salt desert known as the Etosha Pan. This desolate saline depression shimmers with terrestrial heat during the hotter parts of the day, and is surrounded by a number of waterholes that ensure the survival of 114 different game, as well as 340 different bird species. Wait in anticipation at a selection of waterholes that supp ort a rich diversity of mammals and birds. Some of these include rare and endangered species such as black-faced Impala, Roan, Black Rhino as well as the Elusive Eland, the largest antelope on earth. Each waterhole visited holds a surprise as no game drive is ever the same and we keep our eyes permanently peeled to try and glimpse the trunk of the elephant, the yellow eyes of the lion or the chequered face of the leopard behind the next bush. Overnight: Okaukuejo Camp – 1st night Halali Camp – 2nd night Namutoni Camp – 3rd night.

 

Day 14 – Waterberg

After breakfast we will depart from Etosha National Park and drive to Waterberg Plateau via Tsumeb, Otavi and Otjiwarongo.

The Waterberg Plateau is a particularly prominent location, elevating high above the plains of the Kalahari of Eastern Namibia. Waterberg Park and some 405 km² of surrounding land were declared a Nature Reserve in 1972. The plateau is largely inaccessible so in the early 1970s several of Namibia’s endangered species were soon translocated there to protect them from predators and poaching to extinction. The programme was very successful and Waterberg now supplies other Namibian parks with rare animals. In 1989, black rhinoceros was reintroduced to the area from Damaraland. Overnight: Waterberg Camp.

 

Day 15 – Departure

After breakfast travel south towards Windhoek. After strolling through one of the large craft markets in Okahandja, your route takes you between high mountain ranges back to the capital city, Windhoek, and from here travel to the Windhoek International Airport for your outbound flight.

Tourists should book accommodation well in advance, especially for school holidays, when demand peaks. Please note, that not all accommodation establishments accept children under the age of 12 years or 16 years. Please check if you intend taking children.

Select one, preferred type of accommodation or we can design tailor-made, mixed-accommodation tour:

  • two/three-star lodges
  • luxury lodges and hotels
  • camping/tented

Double rooms with an option of a single supplement. Air-conditioned rooms with private bathrooms. Camping tour: tented accommodation in 2-persons tents.

Included in the tour’s price:

Transportation/fuel, accommodation (or tents/camping equipment), meals as per itinerary, national park entrance fee, tour guide for the entire tour, transfer ‚to and from’ the airport, pick-up in Windhoek and guests’ transfer to the lodge/hotel after the tour.

Not included in the tour’s price:

Scheduled flights (bus tickets) ‚to and from’ Namibia, individually extended accommodation or additional transfers, sleeping bags on camping tours, compulsory insurance, water and drinks, alcoholic beverages, optional activities/attractions, snacks, gratuities and tips, trip extensions, personal shopping, visa to Namibia.

Climate

Winter (May to September) Temperatures in the interior range from 18˚C to 25˚C during the day. Below freezing temperatures and ground frosts are common at night.

Summer (October to April) Average interior temperatures range from 20˚C to 34˚C during the day .Temperatures above 40˚C is often recorded in the extreme north and south of the country.

The coast influenced by the cold Benguela current, boasts a relatively stable range of 15˚C to 25˚C. Heavy fog is fairly common at night.

Humidity is generally very low in most parts of Namibia, but it can reach as high as 80% in the extreme north during summer.

The rainy season is from October to April. Average annual rainfall varies from less than 50mm along the coast to 350 mm in the central interior and 700 mm in the Caprivi. The sporadic rains do not affect road travel significantly, however, tourists should exercise caution when crossing or camping in riverbeds during the rainy season, as flash floods are common.

Visitors should pack both warm and cold weather clothing for any visit to Namibia. Windhoek boasts a number of excellent safari outfitters and tourists are advised to shop for clothing upon arrival. Hats, sunglasses, lip balm, moisturizer and sunblock are essential when visiting Namibia.

 

Drinking Water

Tap water is safe and palatable in Namibia, unless specifically stated at particular location. Tourists travelling by road are advised to carry sufficient water at all times. Mineral water and ice are readily available at most service stations and shops.

 

Credit cards

We accept major credit cards such as Credit/Debit Card: American Express, Diners Club, MasterCard and Visa. Check with your credit or debit card company for details of merchant acceptability and other services, which may be available. Please note, service stations do not accept credit for petrol. Plan accordingly.

 

Currency

The Namibia Dollar (N$) and the South African Rand are the only legal tender in Namibia. The two currencies are on par. Foreign currency, travellers and personal cheques can be converted to the Namibian Dollar at any bank or Bureau de Change.

 

Duty Free Import

Visitors may import duty free 400 Cigarettes or 50 Cigars or 250g Pipe Tobacco, 2 litres Wine, 1 litre Spirit or other alcoholic beverages, 50 ml Perfume, 250 ml Toiletry Water.

 

Electrical Appliances

All run on 220/240 volts. Outlets are of the round 3 pin, 15 amp type.

 

Firearms

Handguns are not permitted in Namibia. Only properly licensed hunting rifles with valid permits for Namibia are permitted. Licenses and permits should be applied for well in advance, as attempting to do so at the border is a lengthy process. Hunting rifles are not permitted in Botswana, and have to be carried sealed if in transit to Namibia. All arms and ammunition should be declared even if in possession of a valid South African permit.

 

Health

Medical services in Namibia are of a very high standard. However, the availability of most services is restricted to the main towns. Emergencies and accidents occurring in remote areas do attract a high cost when transport to the main towns is required. Host establishments should be able to organize these services when requested.

The north of Namibia, including Etosha National Park, is a malaria-endemic area. Travellers are advised to have the necessary medication/prophylaxis and also carry insect repellents and sprays. Please consult a local doctor or pharmacist on the correct prophylactics for the specific area of entry. Blood in Namibia is donated by selected, unpaid volunteer. The Blood Transfusion Service of Namibia screens all blood products for transmissible diseases including hepatitis and AIDS. An insurance service for tourists is available from rescue companies providing one to three months coverage for emergency transport.

 

Language

The official language is English. All documents, notices and signs are in this language. Afrikaans and German are both widely used.

 

Personal Safety

Tourists in any country are a preferred target. Be on the alert for handbag snatchers and pickpockets. Exercise caution by keeping your vehicle locked, never leaving valuable/bags visible in the vehicle, using registered “car guards” when parking in towns. Leave cameras, electronic equipment, tickets passports and excess cash in the safe at your hotel when out sightseeing.

It is fairly safe, especially in a group, to walk in the city centre at night. Avoid unlit areas. Ensure that valuables and personal effects are adequately insured.

 

Public Transport

For transfers between Hosea Kutako (Windhoek) International Airport and the city, you can book with a shuttle operator; alternatively use one of the airport registered taxis. A number of companies operate bus services between main towns in Namibia and destinations in South Africa and Victoria Falls. They include Intercape Mainliner, Ekonolux, Town Hoppers and Baileys Transport.

Travel by train is possible up to Walvisbay in the west. Ondangwa in the north, Karasburg in the south and Gobabis in the east.

 

Time

Standard from the first Sunday in September to the first Sunday in April, Namibia reverts to GMT/UTC +2. The Caprivi Region stays on the same time as Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe. Namibian border posts with Botswana and South Africa adjust their operating hours to their neighbours’ time i.e. GMT/UTC +2. Daylight Saving: GMT/UTC +1 during winter starts from the first Sunday in April, and ends on the first Sunday in September.

 

VAT

All goods and services are priced to include VAT. Visitors may claim back VAT for goods purchased in Namibia at the Customs and Excise offices. Department of inland Revenue, in Windhoek. Further details can be obtained from the Ministry of Finance Information Centre by calling (02641) 2092642 or (026461) 2092644.

 

VISA Requirements

All visitors require a passport for entry into Namibia, which must be valid for at least 6 months beyond the intended stay in the county, and have sufficient pages for entry and exit stamps. All visitors must also have a valid return ticket.

Validity:
Visas are valid up to three months from the date of issue for stays of up to three months from date of entry. Extensions for a further three months are available from the Ministry of Home Affairs in Windhoek.

Applications
Consulate (or Consular section at High Commission); see Ministry of Foreign Affairs website.

Application Requirements:
(a) Valid passport
(b) Completed application form
(c) Two passport-size photos
(d) Return or onward ticket or proof of accommodation
(e) Fee
Private: (a)-(e) and, (f) Letter of invitation from Namibian resident.
Business: (a)-(e) and, (f) Company letter (g) Letter from sponsoring company in Namibia

Temporary Residence Permit:
Apply to the High Commission or Embassy; see Namibian Ministry of Foreign Affairs website.

* Please note that a minimum of three working days are required for processing applications

Click here to book now

or send an email to: info@harambeetravel.com